March 3, 2015

Community News

Psychologist & Talk Show Host Dr. Brenda:
February 29, 2012

Dear Friends,

"Creativity is the window to the soul" quotes the German philosopher Rudolph Steiner. This artistic window into our inner being is wide open in the current Lorraine Hansberry Theater production, Blue Orange, in San Francisco. The play features the gifted film and TV actor Carl Lumbly. Over lunch this week Mr. Lumbly shared a bit with me about his character, Christopher, an African-Brit man who may be sane, or not? Two Anglo psychiatrists attempt to help him, or not? And one or both of them may be racist, or not?

017With an insistent power Blue Orange unfolds in a mental hospital in London challenging us to look about us and within us. Lumbly's description of Christopher's longing for a nice green place with palm trees, touches one of the great issues confronting we cement and steel enclosed urban dwellers. Research shows that an environment lacking 'natural energy' promotes 'environmental psychosis'. Perhaps this is why Lumbly states that on any given day he himself feels a little crazy. As he spoke about what drew him to this part, he related his own process of grieving the passing of his much loved wife, 19 months ago. Lumbly compared his own struggles with those of his character. "Christopher made sense to me," he stated.

I believe Christopher will make sense to you as well and ultimately will help us all to make sense of ourselves and our lives. I was deeply moved by the story and the potent mixture of threat and vulnerability in Mr. Lumbly's portrayal of Christopher. He brought to mind many of the day treatment patients I worked with many years ago and frankly, the way I feel when a humdinger life lesson presents itself. You know what I mean, right?

For a great evening of entertainment grab your tickets now for Blue Orange! Be sure to linger in the Lorraine Hansberry Theatre's lovely salon for after theater drinks and conversation, you will have plenty to hash out after Blue Orange.  Visit www.lhtsf.org for your tickets and more details.

SF National Coalition of 100 Black Women in San Francisco Multicultural Weekend Kicksoff at Blue/Orange at the Lorraine Hansberry Theatre, Friday, March 2nd--7 p.m. No Host Bar with 8 p.m. Performance.

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Blessings,

Dr. Brenda

Dr. Brenda Wade

Heartline Transformation Services, llc

Creator, The Love, Money & Seva Seminar Series

www.docwade.com

(415) 775-4866

 

"Don't ask what the world needs.
Ask what makes you come alive, and go do it.
Because what the world needs is people who have come alive."

Howard Thurman

 


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